A Pro Chef Makes Eggs Benedict In A Tiny Apartment | Good Chef, Bad Kitchen | Refinery29

A Pro Chef Makes Eggs Benedict In A Tiny Apartment | Good Chef, Bad Kitchen | Refinery29


Oh, God. This is great, this is great, this is terrible. Hi guys, I’m Chef Mimi. I’m here today in the Upper East Side to cook eggs benedict for you all. But before we get started, subscribe below. Typically, I cook at Vinatería, which is in Harlem, but today I need to know whose kitchen is this? Hi, I’m Shoshana and this is my “kitchen”. Only eggs have ever been cooked in it. The back burner is temperamental, so I’ve never used it, and whenever I attempt to use it, it looks like it’s going to explode and be safe! Solid [laughs]. My first reaction upon opening the door was: this apartment is tiny, but in the same sense I also knew in the back of my mind that it’s alright because everything’s workable. Alright, well we got water…and alcohol, good. It’s small, but I knew we would be okay. First, I’m gonna make the biscuit dough. I see first thing here that we have is a mason jar, which also perfectly has measurements on it. ¼ of a cup of every flour. So, I like to consider myself what I call a backyard baker. I like to do a little bit of this and a little bit of that. Having a mason jar to measure was not very precise, but it also just gave me kind of in the general direction of like cool, this is about what I need. Baking powder, it’s 1 teaspoon so I’m just gonna know in the palm of my hand. Baking soda, the reason we have both is it’s gonna help biscuits really rise up. Salt for ½ teaspoon. We gotta sugar now. Butter, we’re gonna use about 2 ½ tablespoons. You always wanna make sure that your butter is very cold, you don’t want it to melt. Your hands are perfectly fine to be your mixer. I had an ex-girlfriend who loved breakfast so because of that I’ve made biscuits probably, over the course of three years, like 50-70 times. We’re well on our way to making really great biscuits this morning. When I grip it, it’s already starting to some together and I haven’t even added any wet ingredients. Heavy cream and I’ve got 1 egg, whisk this together, mix a little in at a time. Now I’m just kneading the dough together. It’s already at a consistency that I’m not gonna use any more of the liquid for fear that it’s gonna make my batter too runny. We’re gonna set it in the fridge and let it rest. So you’re probably wondering why I’m sitting on the floor. Well, this is the best possible workspace that we have. I can’t say that I’ve ever worked on the floor in my 15-year career, but there’s a first time for everything. Well, her floor’s pretty clean. And I’m gonna casually dry our floor off here. Got some paper bags that I’ve just cut up quickly. So we’re all taped down. I’ve found this bottle of tequila, and since we don’t have a rolling pin I’m gonna wrap it in some plastic just to keep it clean because I don’t like my tequila dirty. If you’re feeling nervous you should probably just go ahead and take a shot of this tequila before you even start. I don’t have to roll too much, I’m just kind of looking for half an inch. We’re gonna need something to make the shape so we can actually have the biscuit itself. So we’ve got a mug, we have this cup. I’ve got a little mason jar here, and this is a perfect size because if you think about it, our egg will fit perfectly on top. With your extra dough you can ball it up and do the same thing again. Kind of an ugly biscuit. And there we go. This is actually a great work surface down here. So next I’m gonna take the biscuits, and I’m gonna place them on our toaster oven. Can’t say I’ve ever used one of these before but. Okay, yep, don’t know what I’m doing. [Toaster dings]. Nope, yes, so I’ve gotta do like 375. It feels like it’s ready now, so I’m gonna go ahead and throw them in and we’re gonna check on them in like 10 minutes, see what we get. My biscuits are all done, I’ve got two sponges here which is gonna be perfect, actually, to take them out. Two dry sponges, not wet. Be careful when you do this. I’m looking at the biscuits, and I’m really happy with them, they smell delicious, they’re perfect. Next we’re gonna make the Hollandaise sauce. I’m gonna need egg yolks and we’re gonna need butter and then the other things I’m gonna look for are an acid. Lemon juice is perfect and also some peppercorn. A little bit of butter, I’m gonna microwave it at probably 30 seconds. Alright and that was about 8 tablespoons of butter. So now I’m gonna take my eggs, and I’m gonna separate them. I think for me I like using my hands best. One more, in here I’ve got my 4 egg yolks. My lemon juice, does anyone have a whisk here? No? A trusty fork here that we’re gonna use. You know when it’s ready to add the fat to the egg yolks. When I do this now I can tell I can’t hold in figure 8, it means I have a ways to go with whisking. While I start to do this, I’m gonna go ahead and put some water in my pot, and the point of this water is to not boil it you wanna simmer it. While we do that I’m gonna just keep whisking away, which might take a little longer since we don’t have a whisk. This is definitely an arm workout. Woo! I am breaking a little bit of a sweat right now. So, since this is taking a long time and my wrist is getting tired. I’m gonna grab another fork. I can see my 8 which is what I’m looking for. So that’s how you know you’re ready. And then my pot of water over here is up now to a boil, so I’m gonna go ahead and just turn it down just a little bit. And the objective really of putting this over, you don’t wanna fry the egg yolks. It’s about lightly cooking them thoroughly all the way through, so I can see now that it’s a really nice thick, runny sauce. We’re gonna go ahead then and slowly start to add our fat to it. A little bit of my butter and whisk really heavily because this is the part where you really want these two ingredients to come together, and if you do a lot and don’t whisk quickly, then they’re not gonna come together. A little bit of fresh cracked pepper in there and then also salt. Let’s see what we got. Tastes really good. As soon as the Hollandaise started to thicken up and I could see my figure 8, it was like the moment of relief in my mind like alright, we’re now on cruise control. We’re gonna go ahead and start cooking our Canadian bacon. Smells like breakfast in here. And if you can hear that sound, that’s the sound of awesome, and I’m gonna give them one more flip and then we’re gonna go ahead and be done. I’m gonna set those aside, and we’re gonna start doing our poached eggs. Also I’m gonna add a little bit of vinegar to the water, which helps the eggs come together. Maybe like 3 tablespoons. It’s a trick like every restaurant I’ve ever worked in, they’ve always used. I’m gonna probably poach 2 eggs at a time just to speed things up a little bit. Don’t touch them until they’ve been in there and you start to really see the egg white form otherwise the yolk will break. See how they have a little bit of resistance, so I know they’re cooked and runny still. So I’m actually gonna take which I did call my ugly biscuits that I think are pretty, I’m gonna use my ugly biscuits for this, and then I’m gonna gently take my poached eggs again. So we’re just gonna do a little bit of freshly cracked pepper on top and that’s it. I can’t believe I pulled that off. The most frustrating part about this process was whisking the Hollandaise sauce with no whisk. A little more muscle than I thought, but I feel good about that. That’s a really good eggs benedict, if I do say so myself. Being a backyard baker, in the end, it helped me out. Thank you so much for watching today guys. Click here to subscribe, or click here to watch more.

100 thoughts on “A Pro Chef Makes Eggs Benedict In A Tiny Apartment | Good Chef, Bad Kitchen | Refinery29

  1. Impressive meal with the equipment! But as a Canadian, I do not want to be associated with whatever that 'bacon' was.

  2. Just when I thought things had gotten better, Chef Mimi had to use 2 sponges as pot holders. I just laughed so hard! It's all about the knowledge, skills and attitude of the person in the kitchen. In the absence of gadgets and kitchen tools, she was able to pull off a not so easy dish. Job well done Dude!

  3. Am I the i only one that thot she was gonna roll the biscuits straight on to the floor when she was wiping it? 😅

  4. had some of the best eggs hollandaise in my life in a diner that served 40 ppl an hr, you're a spoiled brat that never did real short order

  5. Warning to viewers this recipe is damn dangerous. I literally almost burned down my house doing this. I’m covered in oil burns. Never again, never Again !

  6. Tiny kitchen/apartment person here. Before I had a whisk I used two forks, gripping them inwards to one another with the prong ends touching. It looks and acts like a mini-whisk. Saved my forearms that evening.

  7. I've only ever had eggs benedict on english muffins, not biscuits. This looks so good! Why don't more restaurants serve it this way?!

  8. I tried making this. The biscuits turned out tasting soapy and absolutely disgusting! Everything else was perfect. I’m buying store bought biscuits from now on…

  9. Is Mimi the same chef who performed the task of replicating the moss dessert…? She looked pretty beautiful..what the hell happened to her ..

  10. God bless all your souls for marvellous eternal life! there will never be a end! set for eternal life! may all your families have a eternal God loving relationship! Amen <3 🙂

  11. Every chef makes poaching eggs look like an art that has to be learned through pain and suffeing and she just…dumped them? So chill, i loved it

  12. Chefs are so nice and chill, watching this series of videos made me dislike people who don’t cook at home, lol.

  13. Wow, this looks so good !! I recently made my version of Eggs Benedict with Turkey Bacon, feel free to check it out and would love to know what you guys think, thanks.

  14. One of my favorite breakfasts ever has to be eggs neptune (just eggs benedict with either crab or lobster sprinkled on top) sooooo goood!!!

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